Transitive Verbs MadLib Worksheet

Here’s a fun worksheet I worked up to practice using simple transitive verbs.  First, students should fold the sheet in half and brainstorm 12 nouns and 4 adjectives.  I let students use textbooks and dictionaries, and encourage them to find interesting words that are new to them.

Once all the students have finished brainstorming, we proceed to the other half of the worksheet.  Students should first write the meanings of the verbs at the top of the sheet in their native language.  This can be done on the blackboard first if the teacher prefers.  Then students should complete the sentences with the words they brainstormed on the first half of the worksheet.

When the sentences are complete, students pair off and share their original, and hopefully funny, sentences.  This can be made into a game or into more of a pair discussion depending on the ability and energy level of the students.

 

transitive_verbs_wksht

Winter Break Questions

Winter break has come and gone, and everyone is back in study mode.  Here is a worksheet I made up to help students talk about their winter break experiences in English.

It is a fairly easy task that can spark some interesting discussions.  First, using the question words at the top of the page, students make 5 questions to ask others.  The question words and verbs are mixed up, students should pay attention to which verbs they are using with the various question words.

Once the questions are written in the provided spaces, students make pairs and ask and answer one question each about their winter break, writing their partner’s answer in beneath the question.

What did you eat over winter break?

Billy ate fried chicken over winter break.

– or simply –

Billy ate fried chicken.

 

For more advanced students, encourage (or require) them to ask at least one follow up question before changing partners.

 

 
winterbreak_questions worksheet

Because after a while… more time expressions

Here is a worksheet for practicing time prepositions and to get a little more experience thinking in English.  The goal of this worksheet is for students to complete the sentences with content they think of on their own.

The plan is fairly simple.  First, review the vocabulary, and let students write the meaning of the words in the box on the lines provided so as to minimize confusion.  Next, have the students look over the worksheet and make sure that the task is clear and there are no other grammar or vocabulary questions. Once everyone understands the task, let them have at it.

More advanced learners should be able to complete the worksheet by themselves, making original sentences.  For lower ability students, working to complete the task in pairs or small groups may be more effective.  If students are still having difficulties, the task can be completed as a class. When the worksheet is finished, students can share their original sentences with a partner.afterwhile_wksht

Back to School Summer Vacation Interviews

I almost always try to make the first lesson after summer vacation about what students did on their vacations.  In elementary school we stuck to “Where did you go?”, but junior high students are capable of more complex conversations.

The goal of this lesson is to have students ask and answer questions about their summer vacations.  In more advanced classes simply explaining the activity and setting them to it can be enough, but it is always better to review ways to form questions and offer some examples and well as suggest some useful vocabulary.  I start by having the students think of some questions to ask the teachers, and maybe even predict the answers we will give.  Everyone gets a chance to practice the question structures and listen to properly formed answers.

For the actual interviews, I first pass out the worksheets, then break the students up into pairs.  The task is to ask questions and use the answers to write a simple description of their partner’s summer vacation.  I usually provide about 10 or 15 minutes for both partners to complete the task, then have them present their results to the class.  This is an especially good task for very quiet classes, as it gives them the chance to practice speaking, writing, and listening in a structured way.

Here’s the worksheet, enjoy!

Summer Vacation Interview worksheet

Some Grammar Worksheets for Junior High ESL

As of April this year, I’ve begun teaching ESL and English Communication in junior high schools here in Japan.  It’s taken some getting used to after years of teaching in elementary schools, but I feel like I’ve hit my stride.

There’s very little need for me to introduce new structures and drill grammar because the students get more than enough of that in their regular classes with the Japanese English teachers.  I try to minimize teacher-talk and maximize oral communication time, and to that end have made up several Q&A worksheets to practice various expressions and grammar points.

This is perhaps the most basic, and most versatile, of the worksheets I’ve made so far.  Students prepare five questions based on any relevant grammar points or lesson themes, then in take turns asking their questions and writing down their classmates’ answers.  As an activity it allows students to exercise thinking, writing, speaking and listening skills while creating a quantifiable result that teachers can check and grade.  Plus, it’s fun!free_question_sheet

Classroom Games For Larger Classes

It dawned on me that I’ve never talked about the classroom games I use.
Here’s where I fix that.

I use several janken (rock-scissors-paper) games on a regular basis in my
classes. They are a fun and easy way to drill vocabulary and let off steam at
the same time.

 

Janken Stations

I use this game frequently with the phonics flashcards. How it works is
simple. I put five (or so) flashcards on the board. Then I choose one
student to stand in front of each card, manning the station. The other
students form lines in front of each station. The student at the front of the
line greets the student manning the flashcard, then they both say the word or phrase on the card. The two then do rock-scissors-paper. The winner mans the station and the loser joins another line to try again. There is no real “end” to this game, so I usually set a time limit and whoever is manning the stations at the end can be considered the winners.

 

Janken Race

This game is a good lively vocabulary drill game. First, make row of
flashcards across the blackboard. I usually use eight cards depending on the
difficulty of the vocabulary and the size of the blackboard. Split the class
into two teams and have them line up at opposite ends of the blackboard. The
first students in line each point at the flashcard on their end of the row and
say the word or phrase on the card. They then proceed to the next card, say
the word, proceed to the next card, and so on. The two players will meet
somewhere in the middle and do rock-scissors-paper. The winner continues
forward, while the loser goes to the end of their team’s line and the next
player starts. If a player makes it all the way to the other end of the row
of cards, that player’s team gets a point. Whichever team scores the most
points wins!

 

Friend Catcher Janken

This game is another good vocabulary drill game. Divide the class into two
teams and have them line up opposite each other. The teacher stands at the
front of the two lines and holds up a flashcard. The students at the front of
the line each say the word or phrase on the card then do rock-scissors-paper.
The student that loses is “caught” by the winning student. The winner leads
the loser to the back of the winner’s team’s line and the next two students
play. At the end of the game the biggest team wins. I usually determine the length of the game by how many times I want to cycle through the flashcards I’m using.

 

 

I’ve used other games over the years, but these three are the ones I keep
coming back to. They are easy to play, require little or no explanation,
and my elementary school students really enjoy them.

Hi Friends 1 Fall Plan

Summer vacation is officially over, and classes are starting soon! Are you ready?

Here’s my autumn plan for Hi Friends 1.

Lesson 4 – I like apples.
This unit is all about expressing preferences.

I usually start by reviewing the vocabulary presented on pages 14 and 15, and having students write the vocabulary words in English in their textbooks.  I like to make a game out of it, splitting the class into teams and challenging them to read the words as I write them on the blackboard.

From there I present the “I like …” and “I don’t like …” structures and have students prepare a little speech about things they like and don’t like.

Then we proceed to “Do you like … ?” and students prepare questionnaires using the vocabulary from pages 14 and 15 (blanks posted below) to complete in pairs.

This all takes 4 to 5 class periods to complete, depending on class size.

likes interview game esl worksheet

Lesson 5 – What do you like ?

This unit has a good deal of overlap with the previous unit, and an odd T-shirt theme.  I take this opportunity to review shapes and colors before proceeding with the unit.

I begin with shapes, starting with simple shapes and introducing some more unusual shapes.  I try to do several games using the shapes flash cards.

Next I do the colors.  Students know most of the colors already, so I use the color wheel worksheet to add an element of interest.  This is the point where I introduce the “What ~ do you like?” structure, and ask students what color they like.

To wrap up the colors and shapes theme, I do a writing and drawing exercise using the worksheet blank below.  As a class, we select 6 shapes and 6 colors to start with.  After assigning a number to each color and shape, I use a six sided die, rolling once for the amount once for the shape and once for the color. We write the result out in English like so.

“Three red circles” or “5 green stars”

I use each shape only once, replacing them with new shapes as their numbers come up.  After generating 6 combinations of colors and shapes, students use the generated elements to make a design or picture.  It takes a bit of explaining at first, but once the students catch on they really enjoy it.

From there, we move to the textbook.  After practicing the “What ~ do you like?” structure, we do the listening on page 18 and 19, then complete the activity on page 21.

This should also take 4 or 5 class periods to work through.

writing drawing esl worksheet

I also like to do holiday themed lessons for Halloween and Christmas, so this is generally enough to fill up the fall term.  If there is still time at the end of the term, I do the puzzles in Lesson 6 and do some games using the ABC cards in the back of the book.  There’s not a lot to work with in lessons 6 and 7, so if you don’t get to them, don’t worry.

The ~ing Worksheet

Here is the worksheet I’m using to supplement Hi Friends 1 Lesson 2.  The idea of using gestures to communicate is one of the underlying themes in this lesson, and what better way to practice communicating with gestures than a lively game of charades?

After presenting the basic present continuous and giving plenty of examples, I have students complete this worksheet in groups.  This makes the worksheet into a social activity, and allows more advanced students to help others without being too obvious about it.

Once the groups are complete, we practice the new vocabulary, then finish up with a game of Charades using actions from the worksheet.  I sometimes add the question “What are you doing?” to make the game more of a call and response activity.

 

present continous practice worksheet

Hi Friends 1 Lesson 2 “How are you?”

Hi Friends 1 Lesson 2 is a scant two pages, covering a topic most students already have a fairly good handle on.  The “How are you?  I’m fine thank you.” call and response is fairly entrenched in most Japanese learners of English.  I like to take this opportunity to break students out of the “I’m fine thank you” habit and teach them some other expressions and feelings.

 

To that end, I have created a set of feelings flash cards that can be found here.

Also, to make a more meaty lesson, there is an interview worksheet available here.

 

Even with the extra material, this lesson really only requires one class period to complete.  I have some supplemental materials that I use at this time which I will post in a few days.

Simply put, the plan for this lesson is:

1- Greeting

2- present vocabulary (cards)

3- Listening in book (page 8)

4- present Interview task

5- do Interview activity, glue finished interview sheets on p.9

6- Finish

 

Pretty smooth, don’t you think?

Hi Friends 2 Race to 100

Hi Friends 2 starts out with a wildly disjointed unit which begins with counting, using “How many…?”.  From there the unit shifts focus to the alphabet and lower-case letters and the “Do you have a …?” structure.

To impose some order on this mess, I try to keep the focus on counting and numbers to 100.  Drilling numbers gets dull quickly though, so I’ve come up with a little challenge to spice up the task.

The Race to 100 team challenge is really quite simple.  Students sit in a circle and pass a baton or ball while saying a number.  The first student starts at 1, the next student says 2, and so on, passing the baton until they’ve arrived at 100.  Using a stopwatch, time how long it takes each class to make it to 100, and make it a competition.

I’ve prepared a scorecard for keeping track of class times.  If you only have one group of 6th graders, try breaking up the class into smaller groups and running them off against each other.  It’s a good team building exercise.  I usually run off two or three attempts at the beginning of class, then transition to an easy game using the alphabet cards in the text.

Give it a try and share your results in the IRC chat!

2013_RaceTo100_chart