The Color Wheel … simple color names and simple color theory

Everyone enjoys colors, and elementary school students are no exception.  Teaching the colors can be done with drills and flashcards, but why not seize the opportunity to break from routine and do a little hands on learning?

Lesson 5 in Hi Friends 1 brings us a rather poorly executed framework for practicing the “What … do you like?” structure.  The theme appears to be shapes and colors and t-shirts. I have decided to break the lesson up into sections; first shapes, next colors, finally returning to the “What … do you like?” grammar and interview activity.

This Color Wheel worksheet is what I use when teaching colors, students color and write the names of the colors, I talk a little about color theory, and we play a game or two.  The kids enjoy it, and it helps to brighten up these dark November days.  Try it for yourself!color wheel english esl efl eigo noto hi friends

Happy Halloween! Let’s make a Jack o’ Lantern!

Happy Halloween to everyone!  Halloween activities are more or less de rigeur in ESL and EFL classrooms these days, and can take many forms.  Scary monsters, Halloween videos, Trick or Treat,  I’ve tried them all.  This year, I have whipped up a fun Jack o’Lantern project that dovetails neatly with the Shapes flashcard set I posted recently.

 

This activity requires two prints, the shapes and old Jack.  The shapes are for coloring and cutting, students can mix and match to make their own original Jack o’ Lantern.  Pretty self explanatory, really.  Enjoy!

Getting Back to School with Shapes

Getting back into the groove after a long summer break can be difficult for teachers as well as students. Sometimes a few easy and fun lessons are necessary before plowing back into our English textbooks. I like to use the first couple of lessons to talk about the places everyone went and things they did (in English, of course), taking the opportunity to teach “Where did you go?” and “I went to…” along with some other simple past verbs like “ate”, “saw”, and “played”.

This generally works quite well for older students, but can be a bit too much for the first and second graders. Thinking about simple yet useful things to do with my little kids, it occurred to me that I have never taught shapes! A glaring oversight on my part, yet easily corrected with a set of simple Shape Flashcards!

Enjoy!