Transitive Verbs MadLib Worksheet

Here’s a fun worksheet I worked up to practice using simple transitive verbs.  First, students should fold the sheet in half and brainstorm 12 nouns and 4 adjectives.  I let students use textbooks and dictionaries, and encourage them to find interesting words that are new to them.

Once all the students have finished brainstorming, we proceed to the other half of the worksheet.  Students should first write the meanings of the verbs at the top of the sheet in their native language.  This can be done on the blackboard first if the teacher prefers.  Then students should complete the sentences with the words they brainstormed on the first half of the worksheet.

When the sentences are complete, students pair off and share their original, and hopefully funny, sentences.  This can be made into a game or into more of a pair discussion depending on the ability and energy level of the students.

 

transitive_verbs_wksht

Classroom Games For Larger Classes

It dawned on me that I’ve never talked about the classroom games I use.
Here’s where I fix that.

I use several janken (rock-scissors-paper) games on a regular basis in my
classes. They are a fun and easy way to drill vocabulary and let off steam at
the same time.

 

Janken Stations

I use this game frequently with the phonics flashcards. How it works is
simple. I put five (or so) flashcards on the board. Then I choose one
student to stand in front of each card, manning the station. The other
students form lines in front of each station. The student at the front of the
line greets the student manning the flashcard, then they both say the word or phrase on the card. The two then do rock-scissors-paper. The winner mans the station and the loser joins another line to try again. There is no real “end” to this game, so I usually set a time limit and whoever is manning the stations at the end can be considered the winners.

 

Janken Race

This game is a good lively vocabulary drill game. First, make row of
flashcards across the blackboard. I usually use eight cards depending on the
difficulty of the vocabulary and the size of the blackboard. Split the class
into two teams and have them line up at opposite ends of the blackboard. The
first students in line each point at the flashcard on their end of the row and
say the word or phrase on the card. They then proceed to the next card, say
the word, proceed to the next card, and so on. The two players will meet
somewhere in the middle and do rock-scissors-paper. The winner continues
forward, while the loser goes to the end of their team’s line and the next
player starts. If a player makes it all the way to the other end of the row
of cards, that player’s team gets a point. Whichever team scores the most
points wins!

 

Friend Catcher Janken

This game is another good vocabulary drill game. Divide the class into two
teams and have them line up opposite each other. The teacher stands at the
front of the two lines and holds up a flashcard. The students at the front of
the line each say the word or phrase on the card then do rock-scissors-paper.
The student that loses is “caught” by the winning student. The winner leads
the loser to the back of the winner’s team’s line and the next two students
play. At the end of the game the biggest team wins. I usually determine the length of the game by how many times I want to cycle through the flashcards I’m using.

 

 

I’ve used other games over the years, but these three are the ones I keep
coming back to. They are easy to play, require little or no explanation,
and my elementary school students really enjoy them.

Hi Friends 1 Fall Plan

Summer vacation is officially over, and classes are starting soon! Are you ready?

Here’s my autumn plan for Hi Friends 1.

Lesson 4 – I like apples.
This unit is all about expressing preferences.

I usually start by reviewing the vocabulary presented on pages 14 and 15, and having students write the vocabulary words in English in their textbooks.  I like to make a game out of it, splitting the class into teams and challenging them to read the words as I write them on the blackboard.

From there I present the “I like …” and “I don’t like …” structures and have students prepare a little speech about things they like and don’t like.

Then we proceed to “Do you like … ?” and students prepare questionnaires using the vocabulary from pages 14 and 15 (blanks posted below) to complete in pairs.

This all takes 4 to 5 class periods to complete, depending on class size.

likes interview game esl worksheet

Lesson 5 – What do you like ?

This unit has a good deal of overlap with the previous unit, and an odd T-shirt theme.  I take this opportunity to review shapes and colors before proceeding with the unit.

I begin with shapes, starting with simple shapes and introducing some more unusual shapes.  I try to do several games using the shapes flash cards.

Next I do the colors.  Students know most of the colors already, so I use the color wheel worksheet to add an element of interest.  This is the point where I introduce the “What ~ do you like?” structure, and ask students what color they like.

To wrap up the colors and shapes theme, I do a writing and drawing exercise using the worksheet blank below.  As a class, we select 6 shapes and 6 colors to start with.  After assigning a number to each color and shape, I use a six sided die, rolling once for the amount once for the shape and once for the color. We write the result out in English like so.

“Three red circles” or “5 green stars”

I use each shape only once, replacing them with new shapes as their numbers come up.  After generating 6 combinations of colors and shapes, students use the generated elements to make a design or picture.  It takes a bit of explaining at first, but once the students catch on they really enjoy it.

From there, we move to the textbook.  After practicing the “What ~ do you like?” structure, we do the listening on page 18 and 19, then complete the activity on page 21.

This should also take 4 or 5 class periods to work through.

writing drawing esl worksheet

I also like to do holiday themed lessons for Halloween and Christmas, so this is generally enough to fill up the fall term.  If there is still time at the end of the term, I do the puzzles in Lesson 6 and do some games using the ABC cards in the back of the book.  There’s not a lot to work with in lessons 6 and 7, so if you don’t get to them, don’t worry.

The ~ing Worksheet

Here is the worksheet I’m using to supplement Hi Friends 1 Lesson 2.  The idea of using gestures to communicate is one of the underlying themes in this lesson, and what better way to practice communicating with gestures than a lively game of charades?

After presenting the basic present continuous and giving plenty of examples, I have students complete this worksheet in groups.  This makes the worksheet into a social activity, and allows more advanced students to help others without being too obvious about it.

Once the groups are complete, we practice the new vocabulary, then finish up with a game of Charades using actions from the worksheet.  I sometimes add the question “What are you doing?” to make the game more of a call and response activity.

 

present continous practice worksheet

Happy New Year!

Happy New Year to everyone! We are back and getting ready for the 3rd and final term of this school year.

Hi Friends 1 and 2 present us with much the same content as Eigo Note did, so we will be doing pretty much the same lessons as we have done in years past.

Hi Friends 1 brings us the “I study Japanese” theme, followed by the “What would you like?” theme.
For the “I study Japanese” theme, I use these sets of cards.
First, Days of the Week

Next, School Subjects

I finish with this up with a group project, planning an original time schedule.

As a group, students assume the role of teachers and decide what subjects to teach and when to teach them.

Once the schedule has been decided, they then complete the time schedule worksheet, taking turns filling in the days and the classes.

Additional rules may be needed to avoid things like six straight hours of P.E.  I limit subjects to at most twice a day, and require that all

subjects are taught at least twice a week.

Weekends are for things like sports practice, homework, piano lessons, shopping and so forth.

Students also need to come up with a name for their school, an English name of course!

When everything is complete, the groups present their original schedules to the class.

schedule

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here’s the worksheet, I recommend one B4 size for the group, but smaller individual worksheets could

work better if students prefer not to share.

 

 

 

Sports Sports Sports Sports

Sports. Kids like to play sports and like to talk about sports. Sports vocabulary can be used in a variety of ways in the ESL/EFL classroom. In particular sports vocabulary lends itself very well to teaching “I like…” and “I can…” expressions (as well as “I don’t like…” and “I can’t…” ;-)).

It just so happens that “I like…” is the subject of Hi Friends 1 Unit 4, while “I can…” is the subject of Hi Friends 2 Unit 3. While these expressions can be used to discuss a variety of things, using sports can help get the ball rolling. This set of flashcards doesn’t cover all the bases, but presents a broad enough range to encourage further discussion.

I’ve opted to use “soccer” because in Japan (where I teach) and in the US (where I’m from) that’s the term we use. I’ve also intentionally left out American Football because very few places outside the US have an interest in the game, plus it’s just a mouthful to say. If your favorite sport is missing, leave a comment and if there’s enough interest I’ll make up a flashcard for it!

When teaching “I like…” foods and fruit are also great conversation starters. Animals work well also. Mix it up and have fun!

Update: Had a bit of a think and decided to make up a football card as well. No reason not to!