Winter Break Questions

Winter break has come and gone, and everyone is back in study mode.  Here is a worksheet I made up to help students talk about their winter break experiences in English.

It is a fairly easy task that can spark some interesting discussions.  First, using the question words at the top of the page, students make 5 questions to ask others.  The question words and verbs are mixed up, students should pay attention to which verbs they are using with the various question words.

Once the questions are written in the provided spaces, students make pairs and ask and answer one question each about their winter break, writing their partner’s answer in beneath the question.

What did you eat over winter break?

Billy ate fried chicken over winter break.

– or simply –

Billy ate fried chicken.

 

For more advanced students, encourage (or require) them to ask at least one follow up question before changing partners.

 

 
winterbreak_questions worksheet

Back to School Summer Vacation Interviews

I almost always try to make the first lesson after summer vacation about what students did on their vacations.  In elementary school we stuck to “Where did you go?”, but junior high students are capable of more complex conversations.

The goal of this lesson is to have students ask and answer questions about their summer vacations.  In more advanced classes simply explaining the activity and setting them to it can be enough, but it is always better to review ways to form questions and offer some examples and well as suggest some useful vocabulary.  I start by having the students think of some questions to ask the teachers, and maybe even predict the answers we will give.  Everyone gets a chance to practice the question structures and listen to properly formed answers.

For the actual interviews, I first pass out the worksheets, then break the students up into pairs.  The task is to ask questions and use the answers to write a simple description of their partner’s summer vacation.  I usually provide about 10 or 15 minutes for both partners to complete the task, then have them present their results to the class.  This is an especially good task for very quiet classes, as it gives them the chance to practice speaking, writing, and listening in a structured way.

Here’s the worksheet, enjoy!

Summer Vacation Interview worksheet

Hi Friends 1 Lesson 2 “How are you?”

Hi Friends 1 Lesson 2 is a scant two pages, covering a topic most students already have a fairly good handle on.  The “How are you?  I’m fine thank you.” call and response is fairly entrenched in most Japanese learners of English.  I like to take this opportunity to break students out of the “I’m fine thank you” habit and teach them some other expressions and feelings.

 

To that end, I have created a set of feelings flash cards that can be found here.

Also, to make a more meaty lesson, there is an interview worksheet available here.

 

Even with the extra material, this lesson really only requires one class period to complete.  I have some supplemental materials that I use at this time which I will post in a few days.

Simply put, the plan for this lesson is:

1- Greeting

2- present vocabulary (cards)

3- Listening in book (page 8)

4- present Interview task

5- do Interview activity, glue finished interview sheets on p.9

6- Finish

 

Pretty smooth, don’t you think?

Happy New Year!

Happy New Year to everyone! We are back and getting ready for the 3rd and final term of this school year.

Hi Friends 1 and 2 present us with much the same content as Eigo Note did, so we will be doing pretty much the same lessons as we have done in years past.

Hi Friends 1 brings us the “I study Japanese” theme, followed by the “What would you like?” theme.
For the “I study Japanese” theme, I use these sets of cards.
First, Days of the Week

Next, School Subjects

I finish with this up with a group project, planning an original time schedule.

As a group, students assume the role of teachers and decide what subjects to teach and when to teach them.

Once the schedule has been decided, they then complete the time schedule worksheet, taking turns filling in the days and the classes.

Additional rules may be needed to avoid things like six straight hours of P.E.  I limit subjects to at most twice a day, and require that all

subjects are taught at least twice a week.

Weekends are for things like sports practice, homework, piano lessons, shopping and so forth.

Students also need to come up with a name for their school, an English name of course!

When everything is complete, the groups present their original schedules to the class.

schedule

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here’s the worksheet, I recommend one B4 size for the group, but smaller individual worksheets could

work better if students prefer not to share.